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Cancer Cell death Cell cycle Cytoskeleton Exo/endocytosis Differentiation Division Organelles Signalling Stem cells Trafficking
Cell Biology International (1998) 22, 115–125 (Printed in Great Britain)
INDUCTION OF CELLULAR PROCESSES CONTAINING COLLAGENASE AND RETINOID BY INTEGRIN-BINDING TO INTERSTITIAL COLLAGEN IN HEPATIC STELLATE CELL CULTURE
MITSURU SATO, NAOSUKE KOJIMA, MITSUTAKA MIURA, KATSUYUKI IMAI and HARUKI SENOO
Department of Anatomy, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita, 010-8543, Japan


Abstract

Cultered hepatic stellate cells were induced to elongate long, multipolar cellular processes by interstitial collagen gel used as a substratum, as compared to flattened or round cell shapes on polystyrene surface or on Matrigel containing the basement membrane components, respectively. The process induction was inhibited by several reagents as follows: (1) anti-integrin α2 antibody; (2) an oligopeptide, DGEA, an integrin-binding sequence in type I collagen molecule; (3) wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation was enhanced throughout cells including cellular processes by culturing on type I collagen gel. Dual fluorescence staining showed that the core of the processes contained microtubules, whereas the periphery of the processes comprised fibrillar actin. Thus, the process extension was found to depend on integrin-binding to type I collagen fibres, followed by signal transduction and cytoskeleton assembly. The cellular processes included interstitial collagenase and vitamin A-containing lipid droplets. The lipid droplets and vitamin A-autofluorescence were increased by retinyl acetate addition to the culture medium, suggesting an important role of processes in hepatic stellate cell function.


Key words: hepatic stellate cell, cellular process, type I collagen, integrin, microtubule, fibrillar actin, matrix metalloproteinase, vitamin A, signal transduction, extracellular matrix.

f1*To whom correspondence should be addressed at Department of Anatomy, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010, Japan.


Received 15 August 1997; accepted 9 February 1998

doi:10.1006/cbir.1998.0234


ISSN Print: 1065-6995
ISSN Electronic: 1095-8355
Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the International Federation for Cell Biology (IFCB)