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Cancer Cell death Cell cycle Cytoskeleton Exo/endocytosis Differentiation Division Organelles Signalling Stem cells Trafficking
Cell Biology International (2006) 30, 485–494 (Printed in Great Britain)
Morphological and growth alterations in Vero cells transformed by cisplatin
Estela Maria Gonçalvesa*, Cláudio Ângelo Venturab, Tomomasa Yanoc, Maria Lígia Rodrigues Macedobd and Selma Candelária Genariae
aDepartment of Cell Biology, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), P.O. Box 6109, 13084-971 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
bDepartment of Biochemistry, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), P.O. Box 6109, 13084-971 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
cDepartment of Microbiology, Institute of Biology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), P.O. Box 6109, 13084-971 Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
dDepartment of Natural Sciences, State University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Três Lagoas, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil
eRegional University Center of Espírito Santo do Pinhal (CREUPI), Espírito Santo do Pinhal, São Paulo, Brazil


Abstract

Cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent used to treat solid tumours, such as ovarian, testicular and bladder tumours. However, studies in vitro and in vivo have shown that cisplatin is mutagenic, genotoxic and tumorigenic in other tissues and organs. In this work, we examined the effect of cisplatin on Vero cells, a fibroblast-like cell line. The morphological characteristics were investigated using phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and the actin cytoskeleton was labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin. Cell proliferation was assessed based on the growth curve. Cultured Vero cells treated with cisplatin showed behavioural and morphological alterations associated with cellular transformation. The transformed cells grew in multilayers and formed cellular aggregates. The proliferation and morphological characteristics of the transformed cells were very different from those of control ones. Since transformed Vero cells showed several characteristics related to neoplastic growth, these cells could be a useful model for studying tumour cells in vitro.


Key words: Cellular transformation, Cisplatin, In vitro carcinogenesis, Vero cells.

*Corresponding author. Tel./fax: +55 19 3788 6111.


Received 8 November 2004/22 November 2005; accepted 20 December 2005

doi:10.1016/j.cellbi.2005.12.007


ISSN Print: 1065-6995
ISSN Electronic: 1095-8355
Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the International Federation for Cell Biology (IFCB)